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Mula
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A nice, funny, simple and a little bit absurd culture jam. One of many that were made within a design class at the design department of University Caldas, Manizales, Colombia

Comments

rok
8 years, 10 months ago

Mula rula!:)

judiana
5 years, 12 months ago

Haha, funny & great! Does it mean the same as in Slovene??!

oliver
5 years, 12 months ago

well, thats even more fun, yea, "mula" means the same thing in slovene...
so thats a perfect international culture jam :)

Project details

Author(s):Students from Manizales+ mentors: Claudia Jurado Grisales, Oliver Vodeb


Year:
2005


Country:
Colombia


Budget:
0


How does project benefit the client (if there is a client)?
There wasn't any client. Maybe Puma would like to pay for it?


How does project benefit the people you are speaking to with your communication?
I guess it can make them laugh. Or, if they want to think deeper and compare a puma with a mule- they might want to look at the company being not so very cool as they present them selves. We believe that it is beneficial if someone gets a hint for a new perspective.


How does project benefit the wider society?
It was not really shown to a wider society so far. But this was part of educational process, so it is media literacy -which is one of Culture Jamming's main benefits is the benefit and a improved knowledge of one type of radical communication. If this image would be printed- for example on T-shirts or posters- the benefit would be again- the possibility of a different perspective to one of the mayor cool corporations.


How did/does this project benefit author (authors/makers of the project)?
Mentors learned from students and students learned from the whole process as described above.


Tell us something about your view on communication. What is your / your organisation's / initiative's (visual) communication philosophy?
Students were still in the process of learning. So there was no prevalent communication philosophy although kids in Colombia are very well aware about the corporate hidden agendas and pressures, so there was a sentiment towards a critical view on communication and media. As for us the mentors: we could describe our selves as critical communicators and radical pedagogues.


Other projects by the author
Izbrisani (The Erased)